TESTING ACCOMMODATIONS

Standardized tests (e.g., SAT, ACT, LSAT, etc.) grant accommodations such as extra time or use of a computer, for eligible test-takers. These different testing agencies have different requirements in order for students to be considered for accommodations. 

An overview of their respective requirements is below. Please contact Dr. Douglas to discuss the process of applying for these accommodations. In addition to conducting the evaluation, Dr. Douglas will work with families and their school, if applicable, to provide the documentation appropriate for that student's needs.

SAT ACCOMMODATIONS

(SAT II, AP, PSAT)

The College Board, the organization that administers the SAT, SAT II, AP Exams, etc., outlines their requirements for students to be eligible for accommodations. The College Board's eligibility requirements are:

  • The student has a diagnosed disability;

  • The student's disability negatively impacts their participation on College Board exams;

  • The student has a current evaluation (within the past three years, or within the last one year for an emotional diagnosis such as anxiety); and

  • Generally, students need to have a history of receiving the requested accommodation(s) at their school.

Please note that The College Board advises that the accommodations process can take up to seven (7) weeks to complete, even after you have a completed evaluation. It is advisable to consider their timeframe.

THE ACT

While similar, the ACT has their own set of requirements for determining eligibility for testing accommodations. The ACT's eligibility requirements are that:

  • The student has a  diagnosed disability;

  • The diagnosis causes a "substantial limitation"; 

  • The diagnosis is current (within the past three years, or within the past year for emotional disabilities, such as anxiety); and

  • Generally, students need to have a history of receiving the requested accommodation(s) at their school.

ACT outlines different requirements for specific diagnoses. Assuming the student meets criteria for a disability, it is Dr. Douglas' responsibility to provide the relevant information to the ACT to appropriately explain why accommodations are necessary.

THE GRE

The GRE's website outlines several requirements to be eligible to take the test with accommodations. Generally, the GRE requires that:

  • The test-taker has a diagnosed disability;

  • The disability results in a functional limitation;

  • The test-taker has a current evaluation (within the past five years, or within the past year for an emotional disability such as anxiety or depression).

THE LSAT

If you received accommodations on other standardized tests (i.e., SAT), then you simply need to complete a Candidate Form, available from the testing agency's website, and proof of past accommodations. 

If you have never received accommodations on other standardized tests, the application is more involved, and requires you to submit documentation showing evidence of your diagnosed disability. The relevant form can be found here. 

THE BAR EXAM

(New York State)

The New York State Bar will provide accommodations for test-takers, if: 

The test-taker has a diagnosed disability;

The diagnosed disability meets commonly accepted criteria for the disability;

The disability results in a functional limitation; and.

The test-taker has a current evaluation (within the past five years, or within the past year for an emotional disability such as anxiety or depression), unless you were last tested after the age of 21.

The supplemental form that test-takers need to complete can be found here.

What's Assessed?

1

Cognitive Abilities

2

Attention

Intelligence

Motor coordination

 Visual-spatial skills

3

Executive Functioning

4

Academic Skills

Reading

Writing

Math

5

Language

Expressive language

Receptive language

Pragmatic language

6

Memory

Short-term memory

Long-term memory

Working memory

7

Social Perception

8

Emotional Functioning

9

Behavior

Social Perception

Long-term memory

Working memory